Cape Farewell

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The Climate Science Programme

"The great thing about Cape Farewell is that it brings together a group of intellectuals working in science and the arts to discuss a common theme. In the past, there would have been nothing unusual in this. If you look at some of our greatest philosophers and writers, Samuel Pepys for example, was also the President of the Royal Society. One of our greatest inventors - Leonardo Da Vinci - is one of our greatest artists. We’ve actually gone away from this integrated approach to solving problems. Cape Farewell brings us back to our roots and has really been exciting for that."
Simon Boxall, 2008

Background and Partners

Cape Farewell exists because Director and Founder David Buckland read an article by a NASA scientist who said the window of opportunity for dealing with climate change was very short, perhaps less than 10 years. He started to investigate it further and there was a huge frustration with climate scientists who knew there was a problem, but couldn't find a way to communicate it to the public, partly because there were no images or succinct message about climate change.  The ambition for Cape Farewell was to create a new bank of ideas, of imagery, of writing - to find a new language to talk about climate change.

Since the organisation's conception, the knowledge about climate change and science research has directly influenced our programme of activity. The location of our expeditions are led by the science and the artwork and ideas that develop are founded in scientific research. We work with scientists and organisations across the UK and internationally to ensure that our work is founded in science. Partner organisations include University College London, Environmental Change Institute Oxford University, National Oceanography Centre, Scottish Association of Marine Scientists and British Geological Survey. 

The relationship between the art and science

Through our exhibitions and events programme, film, book and youth programme it is clear to see how the artists and young people we have worked with have been effected by the science of climate change.  All our artists have in someway been inspired to respond to the Arctic environment. But our approach also inspires the scientists who work with us to think differently about the how they work. We pioneer an interdisciplinary approach to inviting the artists and scientists to work together.

National Oceanography Centre, Southampton logo British Geoogical Surevy logo Environmental Change Institute logo Scottish Association for Marine Science logo UCL Environment Institute logo
Dr Carol Cotterill reviews the seismic profile from in front of the terminal moraine of the Jakobshaven Isbrae, Disko Bugt, Western Greenland during the 2008 Art/Science Expedition
Illustration showing sea surface temperature. National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
Satellite image showing sea surface temperature (SST). National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.
Launching 'Diskovery Bob' the ARGO float during the 2008 Art/Science Expedition
Feist signs 'Diskovery Bob' the ARGO float during the 2008 Art/Science Expedition
Yadvinder Malhi, Professor of Ecosystem Science, and crew during the 2009 Andes Expedition
Carrying out science research at Wayquecha Science Station during the 2009 Andes Expedition
Photograph by Ana Cecilia Gonzales Vigil
Scientist Kathryn Clark at the glacial lake near Humantay Glacier during the 2009 Andes Expedition
Studying landslides at Tres Cruces during the 2009 Andes Expedition
Science work during the 2008 Art/Science Expedition
Dave Smith collecting data during the 2008 Art/Science Expedition
Artist Amy Balkin in conversation with Dr Simon Boxall during the 2007 Art/Science Expedition
Satellite image showing sea surface temperature (SST). National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.

Satellite image showing sea surface temperature (SST). National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.